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Welcome! This website was created on 21 Nov 2020 and last updated on 22 Apr 2024. The family trees on this site contain 36442 relatives and 1583 photos. If you have any questions or comments you may send a message to the Administrator of this site.
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About Mi'kmaq Tribe Families' Tree
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Pjila’si

I will no longer be adding data to this website.  I have migrated the genealogical and genetic data of the Mi’kmaq Tribe Families’ tree to Ancestry.ca to continue my research of defining the clan lineages of the Mi’kmaq Tribe and to determine the identity of the foreign lineages and the inter-tribal kinship relationships of the Great Law of Peace that married into the Mi’kmaq Tribe.

A Turtle Island tribe, culture, history, territory, and traditions are created by the genealogy of a Turtle Island Tribe. Turtle Island YDNA and MTDNA haplogroups are the root and the branches of the genealogy of a Turtle Island Tribe since time immemorial making it of the upmost importance to maintain the genealogy of the Tribes of Turtle Island.

There exists no mixing of Turtle Island and foreign blood that is thinned out because of inter-marriage.  There is only Turtle Island YDNA and MTDNA haplogroups (clan lineages) that are the roots and the branches of the genealogy of a specific tribe. Removing the ancient clan lineages from a Tribe through legislated membership rules and regulations on paper can result in the genocide of an original Turtle Island Tribe by replacing the original tribal genealogy with an entity (band list or non-profit society) created by legislation and not by the genealogy of the original sovereign Tribe.  No foreign YDNA or MTDNA haplogroup lineage is a founding lineage of any Turtle Island Tribe. 

If a woman or man of Turtle Island ancestry has a Turtle Island YDNA or MTDNA haplogroup they are of Turtle Island ancestry of a Turtle Island Tribe.  The male descendants of a Turtle Island YDNA haplogroup carry forward their father’s YDNA haplogroup (clan lineage) generation after generation no matter whom they have children with.  
The female descendants of a Turtle Island MTDNA haplogroup carry forward their mother’s Turtle Island MTDNA haplogroup (clan lineage) generation after generation no matter whom they have children with. 

Turtle Island tribal YDNA and MTDNA haplogroups (clan lineages) do not disappear because of inter-marriage with other Turtle Island Tribes or intermarriage with YDNA or MTDNA haplogroups foreign to Turtle Island. All individuals with a foreign YDNA or MTDNA haplogroup that have Turtle Island autosomal DNA are descendant to a Turtle Island YDNA or MTDNA clan lineage of a specific Turtle Island Tribe through their kinship relationship to their tribal ancestor.  

Turtle Island has no history or culture of any Metis Tribe of Turtle Island and there exists no Metis YDNA or MTDNA haplogroups in Turtle Island.  Many individuals are comfortable using the term “Metis” with no knowledge they are speaking as a “racist” unless they are describing a family that descends from a family that had “Metis script”.  

Metis script is a “land use policy” that was implemented by the British government through the British North America Act that governed the British Dominion of British trading posts and military forts doing business in Turtle Island. 
 
Surnames of foreign lineages will change as research and genetic testing confirms the original surname first used by a foreign lineage that emigrated from the land of their origin to Turtle Island and married into a Turtle Island Tribe.  For example, the use of the surname Gould instead of Doiron and the use of the name Muise/Meuse or D’Entremont instead of Mius d’Entremont.  Although it is commonly believed the use of the name Muise/Meuse means the lineage is of Mi’kmaq ancestry and the use of the name D’Entremont is the French lineage of the same Mius d’Entremont family in fact the D’Entremont family name also has Mi’kmaq ancestral lineages in the D’Entremont lineage of the Mius d’Entremont family.  

Surnames of original clan lineages will change as further research and genetic testing confirms the original tribal name and Turtle Island DNA haplogroup of a clan lineage.  For example, the Paul family is really the Mi’kmaq clan lineage Pentaquit.  Spelling Variations are Pentaquit, Peminuit and later angelized to Paul.   

The genealogy of the Doucet Turtle Island YDNA haplogroup descending from Germain Doucet raised by the French colonist, Germain Doucet is possibly the YDNA male clan lineage of the Membertou family of the Mi’kmaq Tribe.  DNA testing of the 1610 Wampum Belt Treaty with Pope Paul V could confirm Turtle Island YDNA and MTDNA haplogroups of all who have touched the 1610 Wampum Belt Treaty, including Pope Paul V.  DNA is a molecular clock.  

Because the identity of Germain’s mother is not recorded it is unknown what the mtDNA haplogroup is of Germain’s mother.  Autosomal DNA test results of Germain and his wife Marie Landry’s descendants will eventually assist in the triangulation of kinship relationships to identify and confirm the identity of Germain’s mother and her relationship to the Membertou family.  

The tree on Ancestry.ca provides public access.  The tree is called “The Mi’kmaq Tribe Genetic Tree”.  I have created four media folders entitled:

Brick Wall – DNA Test Lineage
Foreign Lineages
Natural Born Lineages
Confirmed Mi'kmaq Tribe DNA Haplogroups, and 
Great Law of Peace Lineages.  

The Brick Wall media folder has a graphic of a question mark that if clicked on brings you to an individual on the tribal tree that should be DNA tested to determine a clan lineage or the identity of an unknown person who married into the Mi’kmaq Tribe.  If you are descending from any of the people on the tree who are a brick wall, I recommend you test the YDNA and the MTDNA of your lineage descending from the unknown (brick wall) to determine the family lineage of the unknown that married into the Mi’kmaq Tribe.  Determining the clan lineages by YDNA and MTDNA testing contributes to the history and genealogy of the original sovereign Mi’kmaq Tribe by identifying the original Turtle Island clan lineages of the Mi’kmaq Tribe.  Autosomal DNA testing confirms the tester’s kinship relationship to an original YDNA or MTDNA clan lineage of the original sovereign Mi’kmaq Tribe. 

The Natural Born Lineages media folder has a turtle graphic that represents each person that is a natural born citizen of Turtle Island of foreign parents who married into the Mi’kmaq Tribe and are members of the Mi’kmaq Tribe.  Many of whom were part of the genocide of Mi’kmaq Tribal members that were forcibly removed by the British Military under the orders of King George from Turtle Island.  People born and living in Europe who have tested their YDNA or MTDNA have results of Turtle Island YDNA and MTDNA haplogroups that most likely descend from the removal of members of the Mi’kmaq Tribe and their families from Mi’kma’ki, Turtle Island from 1755 to 1763.  

The Foreign Lineages media folder has a flag representing a foreign lineage that has married into the Mi’kmaq Tribe.  The YDNA and MTDNA lineages of each of these marriages will be entered on the tree once the identity and DNA haplogroup is confirmed by a country-of-origin baptism or civil birth record and DNA testing.  Records generated from a record in Turtle Island after emigration of a family lineage are not considered to be proof of origin of a foreign family lineage that has married into the Mi’kmaq Tribe. 

The media folder Confirmed Mi'kmaq Tribe DNA Haplogroups contains the YDNA and MTDNA haplogroups of the Mi'kmaq Tribe confirmed through DNA testing.  DNA test results of an individual is considered a legal document. DNA test results are used in paternity cases, criminal investigations and in courts of law worldwide. 

The media folder called Great Law of Peace Lineages has a Turtle Island Tribe graphic representing an original Turtle Island Tribe with kinship relationships to the Mi’kmaq Tribe that are member tribes of the Great Law of Peace.  Genetic testing of these inter-tribal clan lineages will confirm the history of the Great Law of Peace Council and the democratic system of governance and trade in Turtle Island prior to and after contact with foreign monarchies.  

Under the links section of this page is a link to the Turtle Island Genealogy website the Turtle Island Facebook Group and the Mi’kmaq Tribe Families’ DNA project.  The link to the DNA project provides instructions on how to upload your DNA to Family Tree DNA for free if you have already tested with another DNA company.  There is a discussion board on the DNA project site. 

The Turtle Island Genealogy Facebook group is a discussion group for those who are researching tribal genealogy.  Please request to join the private Turtle Island Genealogy Group through Facebook if you would like to join the discussion group.

Clan lineages already tested are included on the profile of individuals on the Mi’kmaq Tribe Genetic Tree.  Once I have finished adding the Mi’kmaq star to the Mi’kmaq lineages and I have completed the migration of the tree from this site to Ancestry.ca this website will be decommissioned.  After the Mi’kmaq Tribe Genetic tree is completed on Ancestry.ca tree the tree will be uploaded to a Wiki genealogy site.  

The home person on the tree is set to Anli Maopeltoog Membertou, Kji’saqmaw of the Sante’ Mawio’mi, (the Grande Council) and the original sovereign Mi’kmaq Tribe.  The relationship displayed on an individual's profile on the tree shows the individual’s relationship to Kji’saqmaw, Anli Maopeltoog Membertou.  

Kji’saqmaw Membertou met with Jacques Cartier in 1534, 1535 and 1541/42.  Kji’saqmaw Membertou made the Great Law of Peace Wampum Treaty on behalf of Turtle Island with the Holy See, Pope Paul V in 1610.  He also made a concordant with the Holy See, Pope Paul V, making all Catholic birth, baptism, marriage, and death records made in Mi’kma’ki, Turtle Island official records of Mi’kma’ki, Turtle Island.  

There is a link under the links section to Ancestry.ca for public access to the Mi’kmaq Tribe Genetic tree.  Requests for member access will not longer be monitored or responded to on this site. 

Wela’lin
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Getting Around
There are several ways to browse the family tree. The Tree View graphically shows the relationship of selected person to their kin. The Family View shows the person you have selected in the center, with his/her photo on the left and notes on the right. Above are the father and mother and below are the children. The Ancestor Chart shows the person you have selected in the left, with the photograph above and children below. On the right are the parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. The Descendant Chart shows the person you have selected in the left, with the photograph and parents below. On the right are the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Do you know who your second cousins are? Try the Kinship Relationships Tool. Your site can generate various Reports for each name in your family tree. You can select a name from the list on the top-right menu bar.

In addition to the charts and reports you have Photo Albums, the Events list and the Relationships tool. Family photographs are organized in the Photo Index. Each Album's photographs are accompanied by a caption. To enlarge a photograph just click on it. Keep up with the family birthdays and anniversaries in the Events list. Birthdays and Anniversaries of living persons are listed by month. Want to know how you are related to anybody ? Check out the Relationships tool.

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